La Selva was one of the earliest lodges in Amazonian Ecuador and for a long time pretty much the place to go. The high cost of staying there was always an issue and few serious birders appear to visit these days. The lodge is very plush and comfortable with an excellent network of trails and good guides. We used La Selva as our base for birding the N bank of the Rio Napo and some of the nearby river islands.

Our journey in was quiet in the mid day heat but the river has changed considerably since my last visit. Expansion of oil extraction operations has left the Napo looking a much busier river than the one I remember with working vessels and high speed water taxis moving between numerous settlements around which forest clearance is all to evident. There seemed, unsurprisingly, to be far fewer birds along the banks of the river and island shorelines.

Large-billed Tern, Rio Napo.

A short canoe ride from the river edge to the lodge yielded Black-tailed and Green-backed Trogons, White-chinned Jacamar, Long-billed Woodcreeper and Hauxwell’s Thrush. A late boat trip around the lagoon was  abandoned as heavy rain set in but from the lodge balcony we had good views of one of the key target species, Orange-crested Manakin. Watching the day roosting Sand-coloured NIghthawks in the trees below the balcony was another classic La Selva experience.

Sand-coloured Nighthawk, La Selva.

Another resident around the decking was the bizarre folivorous Hoatzin.

Hoatzin, La Selva.

Early the following morning we had our first failed attempt for Zigzag Heron before carrying on to search for a La Selva speciality, Cocha Antshrike. They didn’t give themselves up easily but we secured good views of a female, the more distinctive of the sexes and brief views of a male.

Cocha Antshrike F, La Selva. Photo by Jonás Oláh, Birdquest.

On our way out we had superb views of the spectacular Fulvous Antshrike, a difficult bird to see well but our return journey was frustrating with brief views of Spot-winged Antbird, even briefer glimpses of Black-tailed Leaftosser and a party of Marbled Wood Quails flushed from the front of the line and thus only really seen by the leaders. Eventually we  encountered a pair of Sooty Antbirds which performed well and a Black-faced Antbird followed by a mixed flock which contained Plain-throated, Grey, White-flanked and Rio Suno Antwrens as well an Ochre-bellied Flycatcher. The afternoon was sweltering and the forest still but we nonetheless managed to track down a Collared Puffbird, a couple of Purplish Jacamars and a superb male Wire-tailed Manakin, my first and unsurprisingly a target species for me. An afternoon session on the canopy tower was also a little slow but yielded another target species of mine. Like the manakin Plum-throated Cotinga is not a big rarity but it is spectacular and a bird I was desperate to see. It didn’t disappoint, the colours of the plumage among the most vivid I have ever witnessed. It turned out to be the only one we connected with on the trip. Other birds seen from the tower included Golden-collared Toucanet, Grey-headed Kite, Laughing Falcon, Blue-and Yellow Macaw, Yellow-crowned Amazon and Black-faced Dacnis.

Blue-and-Yellow Macaw, La Selva.

The next morning we returned to the same tower where highlights included Bat Falcon, Ivory-billed and Many-banded Aracaris, Ringed Woodpecker and Black-headed Parrot.

Many-banded Aracari, La Selva.

Ringed Woodpecker, La Selva. Photo by Jonás Oláh, Birdquest.

Descending we discovered a Rusty-belted Tapaculo singing close to the trail and Jonás quickly found an appropriate log and lured the bird in to view. This was another target species of mine and whilst I knew the drill it was still pretty remarkable to see the bird hop on to the designated log right on cue. Two more of my targets followed in rapid succession, a Brown Nunlet and a superb Chestnut-belted Gnateater. I then got better views than I had previously had of Spix’s Guan. A big personal blow followed when I moved away from the group to get an angle on something and missed a Reddish-winged Bare-eye in the process. The mornings successes left me just about able to remain philosophical about this (an occupational hazard of rain forest birding after all) and we picked up a day roosting Tawny-bellied Screech Owl on the way back to the lodge. After lunch a Brown Jacamar was a nice detour along the banks of the Napo en-route to an old stage river island where progress was difficult but excellent views of Castelnau’s Antshrike were obtained along with a few Orange-headed Tanagers. For the second evening running a Kinkajou disrupted dinner as it foraged in the trees immediately alongside the balcony.

Kinkajou, La Selva. Photo by Jonás Oláh, Birdquest.

We left La Selva the following morning getting excellent views of an Agami Heron on our way, a bird I had previously only seen in immature plumage. As we arrived at our first destination, an early stage river island, the heavens opened on us. Torrential rain continued for the entire morning but we soldiered on heroically, eventually scrapping together a list that included Olive-spotted Hummingbird, White-bellied and Parker’s Spinetails and the appropriately named Drab Water Tyrant. A Grey-breasted Crake came frustratingly close but refused to budge further leaving me grateful I had seen this species well in Brazil just a year previously. We finally abandoned the mission and repaired for lunch before moving on to our second base of operations on the S bank.