Our canoe journey to Napo Wildlife Centre was eventful. We delayed our departure as the varzea forest we would be travelling through can be very productive and by the time we set off the rain had stopped and activity levels were high in the late afternoon. Good views were obtained of Spix’s Guan and Blue-throated Piping Guan, Crane Hawk and White-shouldered Antbird when Jonás picked out an interesting Jacamar like call. It came from an Amazonian Royal Flycatcher which we found fairly quickly, perched low down in the vegetation along the side of the channel. As ever in canoes it was awkward as the bird came in to view and was then lost again depending on where you were sitting as the boat drifted, but the bird was tolerant and we all got to see it well. Our guide Jorge has been at the lodge for over ten years had not seen this species there before, though he had heard it a few times. Shortly after this a Chestnut-capped Puffbird was picked out on call and gave us a very hard time before Jonás found it and again we were treated to excellent views of a difficult and good looking species.

Chestnut-capped Puffbird. Photo by Jonás Oláh, Birdquest.

As the light began fading we found an Agami Heron then a Zigzag Heron. The latter had been a new species for me the previous year and though I had seen two they were both spotlighted whereas this one was originally viewable in natural light, under the vegetation where it performed weird dancing movements around a fallen log. It crossed the channel and we then got the more typical views of it perched up but I preferred the original encounter in many ways. Numerous Boat-billed Herons and a roosting Sungrebe enlivened the final stage of the journey.

Sungrebe.

It is difficult to explain the view which greeted us when we arrived at the lagoon on the edge of which the lodge stands. Most of these lodges are pretty staggering, given their locations in the depths of the Amazon, but NWC has a tower rising from the dining area which is lit at night creating the most amazing spectacle as you approach across the lake.

I was pleased to minimise nervous anticipation by getting straight on to the ‘tiputini’ trail in the Yasuni National Park the following morning. We had to move fast to begin with if we were to reach our primary destination in time but picked up a few birds en-route including Lawrence’s Thrush and Golden-headed Manakin. Arriving at the lekking area for Black-necked Red Cotinga we soon heard the explosive advertising calls of the males. Over the next hour or so we watched the birds at fairly close ranges and they are among the most spectacular I have seen anywhere in the world. Leks in Ecuador and Peru are fairly stable but those in Brazil appear to be more mobile in nature, the key determinant everywhere being resource availability. There are not very many ‘accessible’ sites at which the species can be seen and it is in my estimation one of the best birds in the Amazon. The posture is designed to show off the red rump to maximum effect and I commented on how short the wings were. I subsequently discovered that the primaries are modified structurally for use in display. Many sub-oscines, which have comparatively simple vocal apparatus, produce peculiar sounds during display using modified feathers.

Black-necked Red Cotinga. Photo by Jonás Oláh, Birdquest.

A Sapphire Quail-Dove could not be coaxed in to view but as is often the case playing a recording of one species yielded another, in this a case a superb Banded Antbird which gave even better views than the only one I had seen previously when it flew up on to a branch right next to us.

Banded Antbird. Photo by Jonás Oláh, Birdquest.

Other species recorded over the course of the morning included Red-stained and Chestnut Woodpecker, Speckled Spinetail, Yasuni, Rufous-tailed, Plain-throated, Grey , Long-winged and White-flanked Antwrens, Long-billed Gnatwren, White-eyed Tody-tyrant, Greyish Mourner, Citron-bellied Attila, Screaming Piha and Blue-backed Manakin. A Black-faced Antthrush was uncooperative but I did see it whilst I think Jonás was the only person to glimpse a group of Grey-winged Trumpeters which were on the wrong side of a gulley for us. A few people got on to a Red-crowned Ant-Tanager but I was not unfortunately one of them. A peculiar encounter was with a group of King Vultures sitting low down in the forest where they converged on the carcass of a stingray. A final surprise was a female  Lunulated Antbird sitting right by the trail.

Lunulated Antbird. Photo by Jonás Oláh, Birdquest.

It was a long day and we had little time left so repaired to the tower at the lodge where various parrots were passing by and we had our only sighting of the Giant Otters in the lagoon.

First light on day two found us up another canopy tower.

It was a misty morning and a quiet one but a Bare-necked Fruitcrow was feeding a nestling in the tree and I took the opportunity to make some notes as I guessed data on the species nesting habits would be limited. It turned out I was correct and the notes have formed the basis of a short note which has been accepted for publication in an on-line journal run by the Universidad San Francisco de Quito.

Bare-necked Fruitcrow. Photo by Jonás Oláh, Birdquest.

Moving on to the famous parrot lick the stars of the show were a number of Orange-cheeked Parrots.

Orange-cheeked Parrot. Photo by Jonás Oláh, Birdquest.

An afternoon boat trip secured a few more species typically or often found in varzea including Reddish Hermit, Amazonian Streaked Antwren, Yellow-crowned Elaenia and Cinnamon Attila.

Amazonian Streaked Antwren. Photo by Jonás Oláh, Birdquest.

We left in darkness the next morning to reach a section of the channel Jorge had recommended as a good spot for Salvin’s Currasow and almost unbelievably discovered a party of four right out on the exposed bank at super close range!

Salvin’s Currasow. Photo by Jonás Oláh, Birdquest.

It was a stunning end to the Amazonina leg of the tour and the absolute and final hurrah was a Black-spotted Bare-eye which showed fairly well once lured to the edge of the channel.

Napo Wildlife Centre is superb in every way and the guides are truly outstanding. It is expensive but then so are all the Amazonian lodges and NWC is community run so you do at least know that your money is going to local people who, as a consequence, have every reason to protect the forest rather than exploit in destructive ways. I would recommend it to anyone without reservation.