Amazonian Ecuador – Napo Wildlife Centre

Our canoe journey to Napo Wildlife Centre was eventful. We delayed our departure as the varzea forest we would be travelling through can be very productive and by the time we set off the rain had stopped and activity levels were high in the late afternoon. Good views were obtained of Spix’s Guan and Blue-throated Piping Guan, Crane Hawk and White-shouldered Antbird when Jonás picked out an interesting Jacamar like call. It came from an Amazonian Royal Flycatcher which we found fairly quickly, perched low down in the vegetation along the side of the channel. As ever in canoes it was awkward as the bird came in to view and was then lost again depending on where you were sitting as the boat drifted but the bird was tolerant and we all got to see it well. Our guide Jorge has been at the lodge for over ten years had not seen this species there before, though he had heard it a few times. Shortly after this a Chestnut-capped Puffbird was picked out on call and gave us a very hard time before Jonás found it and again we were treated to excellent views of a difficult and good looking species.

Chestnut-capped Puffbird. Photo by Jonás Oláh, Birdquest.

As the light began fading we found an Agami Heron then a Zigzag Heron. The latter had been a new species for me the previous year and though I had seen two they were both spotlighted whereas this one was originally viewable in natural light, under the vegetation where it performed weird dancing movements around a fallen log. It crossed the channel and we then got the more typical views of it perched up but I preferred the original encounter in many ways. Numerous Boat-billed Herons and a roosting Sungrebe enlivened the final stage of the journey.

Sungrebe.

It is difficult to explain the view which greeted us when we arrived at the lagoon on the edge of which the lodge stands. Most of these lodges are pretty staggering, given their locations in the depths of the Amazon, but NWC has a tower rising from the dining area which is lit at night creating the most amazing spectacle as you approach across the lake.

I was pleased to minimise nervous anticipation by getting straight on to the ‘tiputini’ trail in the Yasuni National Park the following morning. We had to move fast to begin with if we were to reach our primary destination in time but picked up a few birds en-route including Lawrence’s Thrush and Golden-headed Manakin. Arriving at the lekking area for Black-necked Red Cotinga we soon heard the explosive advertising calls of the males. Over the next hour or so we watched the birds at fairly close ranges and they are among the most spectacular I have seen anywhere in the world. Leks in Ecuador and Peru are fairly stable but those in Brazil appear to be more mobile in nature, the key determinant everywhere being resource availability. There are not very many ‘accessible’ sites at which the species can be seen and it is in my estimation one of the best birds in the Amazon. The posture is designed to show off the red rump to maximum effect and I commented on how short the wings were. I subsequently discovered that the primaries are modified structurally for use in display. Many sub-oscines, which have comparatively simple vocal apparatus, produce peculiar sounds during display using modified feathers.

Black-necked Red Cotinga. Photo by Jonás Oláh, Birdquest.

A Sapphire Quail-Dove could not be coaxed in to view but as is often the case playing a recording of one species yielded another, in this a case a superb Banded Antbird which gave even better views than the only one I had seen previously when it flew up on to a branch right next to us.

Banded Antbird. Photo by Jonás Oláh, Birdquest.

Other species recorded over the course of the morning included Red-stained and Chestnut Woodpecker, Speckled Spinetail, Yasuni, Rufous-tailed, Plain-throated, Grey , Long-winged and White-flanked Antwrens, Long-billed Gnatwren, White-eyed Tody-tyrant, Greyish Mourner, Citron-bellied Attila, Screaming Piha and Blue-backed Manakin. A Black-faced Antthrush was uncooperative but I did see it whilst I think Jonás was the only person to glimpse a group of Grey-winged Trumpeters which were on the wrong side of a gulley for us. A few people got on to a Red-crowned Ant-Tanager but I was not unfortunately one of them. A peculiar encounter was with a group of King Vultures sitting low down in the forest where they converged on the carcass of a stingray. A final surprise was a female  Lunulated Antbird sitting right by the trail.

Lunulated Antbird. Photo by Jonás Oláh, Birdquest.

It was a long day and we had little time left so repaired to the tower at the lodge where various parrots were passing by and we had our only sighting of the Giant Otters in the lagoon.

First light on day two found us up another canopy tower.

It was a misty morning and a quiet one but a Bare-necked Fruitcrow was feeding a nestling in the tree and I took the opportunity to make some notes as I guessed data on the species nesting habits would be limited. It turned out I was correct and the notes have formed the basis of a short note which has been accepted for publication in an on-line journal run by the Universidad San Francisco de Quito.

Bare-necked Fruitcrow. Photo by Jonás Oláh, Birdquest.

Moving on to the famous parrot lick the stars of the show were a number of Orange-cheeked Parrots.

Orange-cheeked Parrot. Photo by Jonás Oláh, Birdquest.

An afternoon boat trip secured a few more species typically or often found in varzea including Reddish Hermit, Amazonian Streaked Antwren, Yellow-crowned Elaenia and Cinnamon Attila.

Amazonian Streaked Antwren. Banded Antbird. Photo by Jonás Oláh, Birdquest.

We left in darkness the next morning to reach a section of the channel Jorge had recommended as a good spot for Salvin’s Currasow and almost unbelievably discovered a party of four right out on the exposed bank at super close range!

Salvin’s Currasow. Photo by Jonás Oláh, Birdquest.

It was a stunning end to the Amazonina leg of the tour and the absolute and final hurrah was a Black-spotted Bare-eye which showed fairly well once lured to the edge of the channel.

Napo Wildlife Centre is superb in every way and the guides are truly outstanding. It is expensive but then so are all the Amazonian lodges and NWC is community run so you do at least know that your money is going to local people who, as a consequence, have every reason to protect the forest rather than exploit in destructive ways. I would recommend it to anyone without reservation.

Amazonian Ecuador – La Selva

La Selva was one of the earliest lodges in Amazonian Ecuador and for a long time pretty much the place to go. The high cost of staying there was always an issue and few serious birders appear to visit these days. The lodge is very plush and comfortable with an excellent network of trails and good guides. We used La Selva as our base for birding the N bank of the Rio Napo and some of the nearby river islands.

Our journey in was quiet in the mid day heat but the river has changed considerably since my last visit. Expansion of oil extraction operations has left the Napo looking a much busier river than the one I remember with working vessels and high speed water taxis moving between numerous settlements around which forest clearance is all to evident. There seemed, unsurprisingly, to be far fewer birds along the banks of the river and island shorelines.

Large-billed Tern, Rio Napo.

A short canoe ride from the river edge to the lodge yielded Black-tailed and Green-backed Trogons, White-chinned Jacamar, Long-billed Woodcreeper and Hauxwell’s Thrush. A late boat trip around the lagoon was  abandoned as heavy rain set in but from the lodge balcony we had good views of one of the key target species, Orange-crested Manakin. Watching the day roosting Sand-coloured NIghthawks in the trees below the balcony was another classic La Selva experience.

Sand-coloured Nighthawk, La Selva.

Another resident around the decking was the bizarre folivorous Hoatzin.

Hoatzin, La Selva.

Early the following morning we had our first failed attempt for Zigzag Heron before carrying on to search for a La Selva speciality, Cocha Antshrike. They didn’t give themselves up easily but we secured good views of a female, the more distinctive of the sexes and brief views of a male.

Cocha Antshrike F, La Selva. Photo by Jonás Oláh, Birdquest.

On our way out we had superb views of the spectacular Fulvous Antshrike, a difficult bird to see well but our return journey was frustrating with brief views of Spot-winged Antbird, even briefer glimpses of Black-tailed Leaftosser and a party of Marbled Wood Quails flushed from the front of the line and thus only really seen by the leaders. Eventually we  encountered a pair of Sooty Antbirds which performed well and a Black-faced Antbird followed by a mixed flock which contained Plain-throated, Grey, White-flanked and Rio Suno Antwrens as well an Ochre-bellied Flycatcher. The afternoon was sweltering and the forest still but we nonetheless managed to track down a Collared Puffbird, a couple of Purplish Jacamars and a superb male Wire-tailed Manakin, my first and unsurprisingly a target species for me. An afternoon session on the canopy tower was also a little slow but yielded another target species of mine. Like the manakin Plum-throated Cotinga is not a big rarity but it is spectacular and a bird I was desperate to see. It didn’t disappoint, the colours of the plumage among the most vivid I have ever witnessed. It turned out to be the only one we connected with on the trip. Other birds seen from the tower included Golden-collared Toucanet, Grey-headed Kite, Laughing Falcon, Blue-and Yellow Macaw, Yellow-crowned Amazon and Black-faced Dacnis.

Blue-and-Yellow Macaw, La Selva.

The next morning we returned to the same tower where highlights included Bat Falcon, Ivory-billed and Many-banded Aracaris, Ringed Woodpecker and Black-headed Parrot.

Many-banded Aracari, La Selva.

Ringed Woodpecker, La Selva. Photo by Jonás Oláh, Birdquest.

Descending we discovered a Rusty-belted Tapaculo singing close to the trail and Jonás quickly found an appropriate log and lured the bird in to view. This was another target species of mine and whilst I knew the drill it was still pretty remarkable to see the bird hop on to the designated log right on cue. Two more of my targets followed in rapid succession, a Brown Nunlet and a superb Chestnut-belted Gnateater. I then got better views than I had previously had of Spix’s Guan. A big personal blow followed when I moved away from the group to get an angle on something and missed a Reddish-winged Bare-eye in the process. The mornings successes left me just about able to remain philosophical about this (an occupational hazard of rain forest birding after all) and we picked up a day roosting Tawny-bellied Screech Owl on the way back to the lodge. After lunch a Brown Jacamar was a nice detour along the banks of the Napo en-route to an old stage river island where progress was difficult but excellent views of Castelnau’s Antshrike were obtained along with a few Orange-headed Tanagers. For the second evening running a Kinkajou disrupted dinner as it foraged in the trees immediately alongside the balcony.

Kinkajou, La Selva. Photo by Jonás Oláh, Birdquest.

We left La Selva the following morning getting excellent views of an Agami Heron on our way, a bird I had previously only seen in immature plumage. As we arrived at our first destination, an early stage river island, the heavens opened on us. Torrential rain continued for the entire morning but we soldiered on heroically, eventually scrapping together a list that included Olive-spotted Hummingbird, White-bellied and Parker’s Spinetails and the appropriately named Drab Water Tyrant. A Grey-breasted Crake came frustratingly close but refused to budge further leaving me grateful I had seen this species well in Brazil just a year previously. We finally abandoned the mission and repaired for lunch before moving on to our second base of operations on the S bank.

Ecuador 7. Gareno.

Gareno is a superb birding locality in terra firme forest on the S bank of the Rio Napo which can be reached with comparative ease, only the last hour or so of the drive being along dirt road. The lodge is nowadays run on an ad. hoc. basis and only opened when there are guests. This is a big shame because it means staying there, which is basic but fundamentally OK is rather unpredictable. During our stay there was no water in the rooms which was no big issue as we only stayed one night and it is situated on a river but gives some idea of how things are there. It is also difficult to contact anyone there as far as I can tell. In my old age I would prefer a things a little easier were I to visit independently but I would be seriously tempted as the birding is fantastic.

Gareno was included on our itinerary principally to go after two species. It delivered quite a few bonuses in our all too short a time there. We arrived around three on a baking hot afternoon and whilst one of the guides from the lodge went in search of our main quarry we birded the roadside. It was very quiet and whilst we searched for our other main target species at a site which has previously held it I noticed a small amount of activity in the canopy some distance along the road. Some activity was better than no activity and we wandered up to check things out. After a short while working through the few birds we could see Martin began describing something which sounded very much like one species I had in the back of my mind all along, Purple-throated Cotinga. Jonás was thinking the same way and just as we got on to it the bird flew across the road giving good though frustratingly brief views. Among the other birds we dug out of the afternoon heat were Grey-breasted Sabrewing, Dugand’s Antwren and Yellow-backed Tanager. After an hour or so our guide returned with the news that he had located a day roosting Rufous Potoo. It was just a few minutes walk in to the forest and the light was fairly good as we watched the bird which was perched low down and swaying occasionally to mimic the motion of a dead leaf. It appears to be a genuine rarity though its preference for remaining in the forest interior will make it particularly difficult to locate unless vocal. It is certainly a stunning looking bird.

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Rufous Potoo, Gareno. Photo by Jonás Oláh, Birdquest.

Our key target species in the bag we retired to the lodge to sort out rooms etc. A dusk excursion in to the forest failed to find Ocellated Poorwill and as we walked back through the gardens a low booming call in the distance was quickly identified by Jonás as that of Nocturnal Currasow! The guides reckoned they were in an inaccessible area which was frustrating but it was something to hear them and they called periodically throughout the night, audible from the cabins. The following morning our second big target species, the stunning Firey Topaz  was secured in the garden by the river. It was hard work getting views which allowed for appreciation of the glowing colours as the birds fed on insects which they caught in the air leaving them silhouetted. As they descended it was possible to see the colours against the green of the background foliage and eventually one perched up a couple of times though it didn’t allow too much time for admiration. A pair of Lemon-throated Barbets had provided distraction whilst we waited but once the Topaz show was over we headed for the road again. As we clambered out of the gulley notable inhabitants of the understorey were a very smart Yellow-browed Antbird and a flock of Fulvous-crested Tanagers

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Fulvous-crested Tanager, Gareno. Photo by Jonás Oláh, Birdquest.

The road was productive again with excellent views of a pair of Purple-throated Cotingas, a pair of Purple-throated Fruitcrows and a White-browed Purpletuft among the highlights and a supporting cast that included Ivory-billed and Many-banded Aracaris, White-throated Toucan, Grey Antbird, Opal-crowned and Yellow-bellied Tanagers. Back near the lodge the guides had found a day roosting Crested Owl which was low down, allowing better views than I had previously had of this spectacular species and understandably popular with those who had not encountered it before.

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Crested Owl, Gareno. Photo by Jonás Oláh, Birdquest.

Good birds kept coming to the very end of our stay with a fruiting tree along the short walk back to the lodge attended by Brown-winged Schiffornis, Dwarf Tyrant-Manakin Blue-crowned, White-bearded and a stunning Western Striped Manakin.

Gareno is run by the Huaorani Indians and was once popular with visiting birders as a pair of Harpy Eagles nested there. Since then it appears visitor numbers have fallen away. This is a great shame as the birding is outstanding and the forest is being degraded. The road in is an oil road and there are checkpoints to prevent settlement on Huaorani land by outsiders. It appears however that settlement is nonetheless taking place. An upgrade of the lodge would I imagine bring in revenue for the Huaorani and focus attention on the forest and what happens there. It may not be unique but how many places can there be where visiting birders can listen to Nocturnal Currasow from their bed?

Ecuador 6. Wild Sumaco

Our first destination on the E slope was the excellent Wild Sumaco Lodge. On my first trip to Ecuador there were no easily accessible birding localities in the foothills of the E slope so I was looking forward to our time here as the forests around Wild Sumaco are home to a number of localised birds which can be searched for from a great trail network. We discovered on arrival that the forests had gone comparatively quiet over the previous couple of weeks but we still managed to dig out some great birds during our two and a half day stay.

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The view from the balcony at Wild Sumaco with Antisana in the distance.

Numerous good birds can be seen around the lodge itself and among the selection of hummingbirds were such spectacular species as Rufous-vented Whitetip, Napo Sabrewing, Gould’s Jewelfront and Wire-crested Thorntail.

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Wire-crested Thorntail, Wild Sumaco. Photo by Jonás Oláh, Birdquest.

Among the birds I was particularly pleased to see along the roadside were Golden-collared Toucanet, Bronze-green Euphonia, Golden-collared Honeycreeper and Orange-eared Tanager whilst the fruiting trees also attracted a pair of Pale-eyed Thrushes and migrant Swainson’s Thrushes were much in evidence. Much of our time was devoted to a long trail network which over two and a half days yielded some great birds. A pair of day roosting Band-bellied Owls were found by one of the bird guides at the lodge and by going in carefully and one at a time we were all able to get great views of these magnificent birds without disturbing them.

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Band-bellied Owl, Wild Sumaco. Photo by Jonás Oláh, Birdquest.

Among the Thamnophilidae Foothill and Yellow-breasted Antwrens, Blackish, Common Scale-backed and Spot-backed Antbirds were notable but the undisputed highlight was excellent views of the uncommon and super-attractive White-streaked Antvireo.

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White-streaked Antvireo, Wild Sumaco. Photo by Jonás Oláh, Birdquest.

Firey-throated Fruiteater had to be somewhere among all these fruiting trees and in the end Herman found a male but couldn’t get us on to it before it flew to a position right above us where only Jonás managed a brief view. He subsequently found a female but it was no more co-operative, the views again brief and I again in the wrong place. I was however fortunate in being at the front of the line when Jonas picked up a Short-tailed Antthrush walking calmly but quickly through the dappled light of the forest floor. Further heroic efforts by Jonás did eventually secure good views of another scarce cotingid which is something of a local speciality at Sumaco, Grey tailed Piha. We also saw several stunning male Blue-rumped Manakins. Other species worthy of mention include Ecuadorian Piedtail, Northern White-crowned Tapaculo, Foothill Elaenia, Yellow-cheeked Becard, Rufous-naped and Olivaceous Greenlets. For those of us who had not seen one before one of the most appreciated encounters along the trails was with a White-tipped Sicklebill. Sicklebills are not so much rare as difficult to see as they principally feed whilst perched, which may afford good viewing opportunities but their visits to given blooms can be brief and once they have landed the birds are somewhat unobtrusive.

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White-tipped Sicklebill, Wild Sumaco. Photo by Jonás Oláh, Birdquest.

The other notable feature of birding at Wild Sumaco is the feeding station where the star of the show is Plain-backed Antpitta, reputedly one of the hardest species to see by normal means. I was fortunate enough to find one at Mindo when I first visited Ecuador but that was many years ago and I certainly did not get to watch it for a protracted period. At Sumaco a pair had clearly nested nearby and were busy snaffling up as many of the worms as possible before bouncing off to feed young. We were concerned that there would be no food left for any other birds but eventually the other regular species did come in. Ochre-breasted Antpitta is another species I have seen at Mindo but the race occurring there is the W slope form, named after the town. I saw it a couple of times there and watched one for a while but never saw them feed and was surprised by the brightness of the underwing coverts which are exposed when it flicks from side to side as it dispatches its prey. Angel famously christened one of his habituated birds Shakira after the Colombian pop star and her hip-wiggling dance moves. Periodically other species turn up and we were fortunate in that a Spotted Nightingale Thrush was appearing during our stay, though unfortunate that a Short-tailed Antthrush had recently departed.

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Spotted Nightingale Thrush, Wild Sumaco. Photo by Jonás Oláh, Birdquest.

A good E slope bird discovered whilst we waited at the feeding station was a Black-streaked Puffbird, a representative of another of my favourite groups.

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Black-streaked Puffbird, Wild Sumaco. Photo by Jonás Oláh, Birdquest.

During our final afternoon I elected to stay at the feeding station in the hope the antthrush might return but most of the group were successful in an excursion to track down Blackish Rail, a species I had a least seen before at Rio Bombuscaro, lower down on the E slope. Stopping briefly in a rather denuded area as we left Sumaco I was pleased to get my first super close and unobscured views of Wing-banded Wren as well as picking up a Fulvous Shrike-Tanager. White-tailed Hillstar was added to the list during a roadside stop and then it was time to head for the Amazon.

 

Ecuador 5. La Reunion Road & Chical Road

Waiting at the jetty after our boat trip out from Playa del Oro additions to the list included a Black Hawk Eagle and a Tennessee Warbler, a scarce migrant in Ecuador. Moving on to Humedal de Yalaré which still holds some good birds but has been significantly degraded in recent years White-necked, Pied and Black-breasted Puffbirds were found in rapid succession whilst a pair of Slaty-tailed Trogon were the first and last we would see on the tour.

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Slaty-tailed Trogon, Humadal de Yalaré. Photo by Jonás Oláh, Birdquest.

After lunch a brief stop at a site Juan Carlos knows for Golden-chested Tanager was successful though the birds remained distant and we pushed on for our first birding session along the La Reunion Road. As is so often the case the road affording access to the forest (which runs to a village) has facilitated its partial destruction and the experience is thus a bittersweet one. Logs had been used to line the muddy road in sections and we were unable to travel all that far with the time at our disposal. Degradation along the roadside edges makes for excellent viewing in to the mid and higher levels and notable among the residents of these on our first outing were Chocó Trogon, Chocó Woodpecker (the first time the species was recorded on a Birdquest tour) and a Black-tipped Cotinga low down in a roadside tree, the latter species generally seen (by visiting birders at least) at extreme range from miradors.

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Chocó Trogon, La Reunion Road. Photo by Jonás Oláh, Birdquest.

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Black-tipped Cotinga, La Reunion Road. Photo by Jonás Oláh, Birdquest.

Emerald Tanager and close up views of Golden-chested Tanager were among the other highlights along with a much appreciated Brown-billed Scythebill which performed well. For ground strata skulkers it would be necessary to find a trail in but we did manage good views of a Chocó Tapaculo in a roadside gulley.

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Chocó Tapaculo, La Reunion Road. Photo by Jonás Oláh, Birdquest.

Hearing a Rufous-crowned Pittasoma the following morning was not nearly so frustrating as it might have been a few days earlier but it was annoying not to have any real chance with a Black-headed Antthrush. Birding trails in that forest (if any exist or are accessible) would clearly be as exciting as it would difficult. Close views of some Rose-faced Parrots perched was a relief after a couple of high speed fly pasts here and at Playa del Oro whilst another Chocó endemic and another first for Birdquest was a Yellow-green Bush Tanager.

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Yellow-green Bush Tanager, La Reunion Road. Photo by Jonás Oláh, Birdquest.

The previous afternoon a Tooth-billed Hummingbird found by Jonas had visited a roadside flower with such speed that nobody else really got any kind of view and so we headed back to the location as the species is a trap-liner and should return. We were somewhat short of time and thus delighted when the bird zipped in to feed for just long enough that we all had pretty good views.

Our next stop was along the Chical Road and this one at least has yet to lead to systematic stripping of the forest at the higher elevations, though clearance for agriculture is apparent. It is this feature which perhaps makes it the best locality to see another famously difficult Chocó endemic. Hoary Puffleg is a hummingbird of the forest interior which, whilst it is very occasionally seen in more open edge habitat has yet to succumb to the lure of the nectar feeders. Along a particular section of the Chical Road  it can be found using partially cleared areas making it far easier to see.

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Hoary Puffleg, Chical Road. Photo by Jonás Oláh, Birdquest.

We saw two or three in an hour or so along with three superb Purplish-mantled Tanagers which were also easily found and another Chocó endemic which has become difficult elsewhere in recent years, the appropriately named Beautiful Jay.

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Beautiful Jay, Chical Road. Photo by Jonás Oláh, Birdquest.

That was the end of our time on the W slope, it was all too brief but a spectacular success given that.

The Bonaparte’s Gull at Farmoor

On Saturday evening whilst doing the Draycote roost John Judge suggested it was about time he/we went to have look at the 1st W/S Bonaparte’s Gull which has now been present for some time at Farmoor in Oxfordshire. Dan Watson had called that same evening keen to get out of the county and ‘actually see something’ the next day, so after work on Sunday instead of taking the sensible course of action and going home to deal with paperwork, I drove over to Dan’s and picked up a lift to Farmoor. I’m so pleased I did as the bird was constantly on view for the two or three hours we spent there and very close in the entire time. The Bonaparte’s spent much of its time gleaning insects from the surface but was also catching numerous fish.

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1 st W/S Bonaparte’s Gull, Farmoor Reservoir.

This behaviour was not lost on the Black-headed Gulls present which took to trying to steal a meal, providing ample opportunities to compare the two species. Whilst the quality of the following two images is poor they are worth including for illustrative purposes. Though the size difference is perhaps exaggerated here by the ‘flattened’ posture adopted by the Bonaparte’s, one which interestingly it seemed to utilise when being defensive and aggressive (which it was with surprising frequency given its smaller size and weight), it is nonetheless remarkable. As a result of these aggressive encounters the bird was vocal too, the peculiar high-pitched tern like call quite distinct from that of any gull regularly encountered in the UK. When no other birds were available for size comparison the tiny, short narrow bill was distinctive. Though the Bonaparte’s is at a poor angle in the shot below the darker tertials are obvious.

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1st W/S Bonaparte’s Gull and 1st W/S Black-headed Gull, Farmoor Reservoir.

The cleaner inner upper-wing of the Bonaparte’s is well illustrated here, the narrower, neater darker trailing edge and carpal bar and cleaner inner primaries combining to create a distinctive appearance. Black-head Gull of the same age typically shows a more extensive and more diffuse trailing edge to the wing and more extensive white in the primaries and outer greater primary-coverts resulting in a larger, cleaner white ‘wedge’ along the outer forewing.

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1st W/S Bonaparte’s Gull and 1st W/S Black-headed Gull, Farmoor Reservoir.

Photos taken at closer range and with more time to steady the camera show the spread wing pattern well. The clean underwing lacks the dark grey primaries typical of Black-headed Gull of the same age (see previous flight shot) but Malling-Olsen and the Collins Guide both warn of the potential for worn individuals to show rather translucent primaries (a photo of such a bird can be found in Gulls). These authors also point out that 1st W/S birds may be slightly smaller and I have certainly seen ‘runt’ Black-headed Gulls a few times in the Draycote roost and one bird with translucent primaries which gave me a scare during brief views at extreme range.

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1 st W/S Bonaparte’s Gull, Farmoor Reservoir.

The greater primary-coverts show an inverse pattern to that of Black-headed Gull in that they have dark bases to the outers but are otherwise pale whilst Black-headed Gull typically has white outers and dark centres to the inners.

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1 st W/S Bonaparte’s Gull, Farmoor Reservoir.

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1 st W/S Bonaparte’s Gull, Farmoor Reservoir.

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1 st W/S Bonaparte’s Gull, Farmoor Reservoir.

On the water the dark bill and extensive grey on the hind-neck and upper breast sides were obvious features but would be far harder to be sure of at range and in the failing light of a gull roost. Having said that we had originally gone to the wrong place and when Dan first picked the bird up across the width of the reservoir in the heat shimmer the latter feature was just about discernible. Black-headed Gull can show something similar and though typically less obvious in that species I have found its appearance exaggerated in poor light. The ear spot was also very neat and only a minority of Bonaparte’s Gull will develop a (blackish) hood in their first summer.

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1 st W/S Bonaparte’s Gull, Farmoor Reservoir.

There was no sign of tail moult although the extremely long tail-coverts overlaid the central tail feathers and sometimes gave the impression of replaced feathers.

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1 st W/S Bonaparte’s Gull, Farmoor Reservoir.

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1 st W/S Bonaparte’s Gull, Farmoor Reservoir.

Finally, and for no reason other than the fact that it was so pretty here are a couple more photos, long shots with a bit of background for ‘mood’.

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1 st W/S Bonaparte’s Gull, Farmoor Reservoir.

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1 st W/S Bonaparte’s Gull, Farmoor Reservoir.