Waiting at the jetty after our boat trip out from Playa del Oro additions to the list included a Black Hawk Eagle and a Tennessee Warbler, a scarce migrant in Ecuador. Moving on to Humedal de Yalaré which still holds some good birds but has been significantly degraded in recent years White-necked, Pied and Black-breasted Puffbirds were found in rapid succession whilst a pair of Slaty-tailed Trogon were the first and last we would see on the tour.

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Slaty-tailed Trogon, Humadal de Yalaré. Photo by Jonás Oláh, Birdquest.

After lunch a brief stop at a site Juan Carlos knows for Golden-chested Tanager was successful though the birds remained distant and we pushed on for our first birding session along the La Reunion Road. As is so often the case the road affording access to the forest (which runs to a village) has facilitated its partial destruction and the experience is thus a bittersweet one. Logs had been used to line the muddy road in sections and we were unable to travel all that far with the time at our disposal. Degradation along the roadside edges makes for excellent viewing in to the mid and higher levels and notable among the residents of these on our first outing were Chocó Trogon, Chocó Woodpecker (the first time the species was recorded on a Birdquest tour) and a Black-tipped Cotinga low down in a roadside tree, the latter species generally seen (by visiting birders at least) at extreme range from miradors.

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Chocó Trogon, La Reunion Road. Photo by Jonás Oláh, Birdquest.

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Black-tipped Cotinga, La Reunion Road. Photo by Jonás Oláh, Birdquest.

Emerald Tanager and close up views of Golden-chested Tanager were among the other highlights along with a much appreciated Brown-billed Scythebill which performed well. For ground strata skulkers it would be necessary to find a trail in but we did manage good views of a Chocó Tapaculo in a roadside gulley.

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Chocó Tapaculo, La Reunion Road. Photo by Jonás Oláh, Birdquest.

Hearing a Rufous-crowned Pittasoma the following morning was not nearly so frustrating as it might have been a few days earlier but it was annoying not to have any real chance with a Black-headed Antthrush. Birding trails in that forest (if any exist or are accessible) would clearly be as exciting as it would difficult. Close views of some Rose-faced Parrots perched was a relief after a couple of high speed fly pasts here and at Playa del Oro whilst another Chocó endemic and another first for Birdquest was a Yellow-green Bush Tanager.

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Yellow-green Bush Tanager, La Reunion Road. Photo by Jonás Oláh, Birdquest.

The previous afternoon a Tooth-billed Hummingbird found by Jonas had visited a roadside flower with such speed that nobody else really got any kind of view and so we headed back to the location as the species is a trap-liner and should return. We were somewhat short of time and thus delighted when the bird zipped in to feed for just long enough that we all had pretty good views.

Our next stop was along the Chical Road and this one at least has yet to lead to systematic stripping of the forest at the higher elevations, though clearance for agriculture is apparent. It is this feature which perhaps makes it the best locality to see another famously difficult Chocó endemic. Hoary Puffleg is a hummingbird of the forest interior which, whilst it is very occasionally seen in more open edge habitat has yet to succumb to the lure of the nectar feeders. Along a particular section of the Chical Road  it can be found using partially cleared areas making it far easier to see.

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Hoary Puffleg, Chical Road. Photo by Jonás Oláh, Birdquest.

We saw two or three in an hour or so along with three superb Purplish-mantled Tanagers which were also easily found and another Chocó endemic which has become difficult elsewhere in recent years, the appropriately named Beautiful Jay.

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Beautiful Jay, Chical Road. Photo by Jonás Oláh, Birdquest.

That was the end of our time on the W slope, it was all too brief but a spectacular success given that.