Our first destination on the east slope was the excellent Wild Sumaco Lodge. On my first trip to Ecuador there were no easily accessible birding localities in the foothills of the east slope so I was looking forward to our time here as the forests around Wild Sumaco are home to a number of localised birds which can be searched for from a great trail network. We discovered on arrival that the forests had gone comparatively quiet over the previous couple of weeks but we still managed to dig out some great birds during our two and a half day stay.

Antisana from Sumaco

The view from the balcony at Wild Sumaco with Antisana in the distance.

Numerous good birds can be seen around the lodge itself and among the selection of hummingbirds were such spectacular species as Rufous-vented Whitetip, Napo Sabrewing, Gould’s Jewelfront and Wire-crested Thorntail.

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Wire-crested Thorntail, Wild Sumaco. Photo by Jonás Oláh, Birdquest.

Among the birds I was particularly pleased to see along the roadside were Golden-collared Toucanet, Bronze-green Euphonia, Golden-collared Honeycreeper and Orange-eared Tanager whilst the fruiting trees also attracted a pair of Pale-eyed Thrushes and migrant Swainson’s Thrushes were much in evidence. Much of our time was devoted to a long trail network which over two and a half days yielded some great birds. A pair of day roosting Band-bellied Owls were found by one of the bird guides at the lodge and by going in carefully and one at a time we were all able to get great views of these magnificent birds without disturbing them.

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Band-bellied Owl, Wild Sumaco. Photo by Jonás Oláh, Birdquest.

Among the Thamnophilidae Foothill and Yellow-breasted Antwrens, Blackish, Common Scale-backed and Spot-backed Antbirds were notable but the undisputed highlight was excellent views of the uncommon and super-attractive White-streaked Antvireo.

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White-streaked Antvireo, Wild Sumaco. Photo by Jonás Oláh, Birdquest.

Firey-throated Fruiteater had to be somewhere among all these fruiting trees and in the end Herman found a male but couldn’t get us on to it before it flew to a position right above us where only Jonás managed a brief view. He subsequently found a female but it was no more co-operative, the views again brief and I again in the wrong place. I was however fortunate in being at the front of the line when Jonas picked up a Short-tailed Antthrush walking calmly but quickly through the dappled light of the forest floor. Further heroic efforts by Jonás did eventually secure good views of another scarce cotingid which is something of a local speciality at Sumaco, Grey tailed Piha. We also saw several stunning male Blue-rumped Manakins. Other species worthy of mention include Ecuadorian Piedtail, Northern White-crowned Tapaculo, Foothill Elaenia, Yellow-cheeked Becard, Rufous-naped and Olivaceous Greenlets. For those of us who had not seen one before one of the most appreciated encounters along the trails was with a White-tipped Sicklebill. Sicklebills are not so much rare as difficult to see as they principally feed whilst perched, which may afford good viewing opportunities but their visits to given blooms can be brief and once they have landed the birds are somewhat unobtrusive.

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White-tipped Sicklebill, Wild Sumaco. Photo by Jonás Oláh, Birdquest.

The other notable feature of birding at Wild Sumaco is the feeding station where the star of the show is Plain-backed Antpitta, reputedly one of the hardest species to see by normal means. I was fortunate enough to find one at Mindo when I first visited Ecuador but that was many years ago and I certainly did not get to watch it for a protracted period. At Sumaco a pair had clearly nested nearby and were busy snaffling up as many of the worms as possible before bouncing off to feed young. We were concerned that there would be no food left for any other birds but eventually the other regular species did come in. Ochre-breasted Antpitta is another species I have seen at Mindo but the race occurring there is the west slope form, named after the town. I saw it a couple of times there and watched one for a while but never saw them feed and was surprised by the brightness of the underwing coverts which are exposed when it flicks from side to side as it dispatches its prey. Angel famously christened one of his habituated birds Shakira after the Colombian pop star and her hip-wiggling dance moves. Periodically other species turn up and we were fortunate in that a Spotted Nightingale Thrush was appearing during our stay, though unfortunate that a Short-tailed Antthrush had recently departed.

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Spotted Nightingale Thrush, Wild Sumaco. Photo by Jonás Oláh, Birdquest.

A good E slope bird discovered whilst we waited at the feeding station was a Black-streaked Puffbird, a representative of another of my favourite groups.

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Black-streaked Puffbird, Wild Sumaco. Photo by Jonás Oláh, Birdquest.

During our final afternoon I elected to stay at the feeding station in the hope the antthrush might return but most of the group were successful in an excursion to track down Blackish Rail, a species I had a least seen before at Rio Bombuscaro, lower down on the E slope. Stopping briefly in a rather denuded area as we left Sumaco I was pleased to get my first super close and unobscured views of Wing-banded Wren as well as picking up a Fulvous Shrike-Tanager. White-tailed Hillstar was added to the list during a roadside stop and then it was time to head for the Amazon.