With gales forecast at the coast last week and westerly winds set to swing north west I thought we might finally be in for some half-decent birding at Draycote as it has generally been pretty good for vagrant seabirds, within a West Midlands context. In the event we got nothing, an Ad. and Juv. Arctic Tern being the only arrivals to come in with the weather.

Juv. Arctic Tern, Draycote Water.

Juv. Arctic Tern, Draycote Water.

To be entirely fair the only birds the blow really did bring in to the Midlands were Grey Phalaropes which, for the most part, fell to our south and west. That is a really good bird though and there were quite a few of them. I had been predicting a Sabine’s Gull would turn up in the region somewhere and just one did. It was found at Daventry Reservoir which is just to the north-east of the ridge separating the Upper Leam from the upper reaches of the Cherwell. From my flat it can barely be five miles, which you might think a good reason to go and see it. You would be right, but I was that demoralised I didn’t really want to on day one. I cracked on the afternoon of day two however as the bird was hanging around on the shoreline at extremely close range. Along with a lot of other people this is my favourite gull species and aside from two adults which could be ‘breaded in’ at St Ives after the legendary 1982 seawatch there, the closest I have ever got to one.  That gale brought two Leach’s Petrels to Draycote, but then it was far more powerful than last week’s.

Juv. Sabine’s Gull, Daventry Reservoir.

Juv. Sabine’s Gull, Daventry Reservoir.

Juv. Sabine’s Gull, Daventry Reservoir.

Juv. Sabine’s Gull, Daventry Reservoir.

Juv. Sabine’s Gull, Daventry Reservoir.

Ospreys have been seen at Draycote every week since the end of July and there have been at least two individuals involved, the bird seen on 13-14/09 having paler secondaries and underwing-coverts and having dropped a primary on the left wing, whereas the bird I last saw there on 21/08 and which had probably been present for around three weeks had a missing primary on the right wing. That is pretty much it in recent weeks, though Dunlin and Common ringed Plover are present daily and Little Ringed Plover, Common Greenshank, Common Redshank and Ruff have all put in appearances. The peak count of Yellow-legged Gulls in the roost thus far was 38 on 30/08 and there are still excellent opportunities to study juveniles in the daytime, though I have not managed any good photos this season. So far there have been just two Caspian Gulls.